Tag Archives: marvellous

Logan (2017)

“His Time Has Come”

Directed by James Mangold
Starring Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Richard E. Grant, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, Dafne Keen

As always, there will be spoilers in this review.

In the not-too-distant future, Logan (Jackman) is living on the (unwalled) Texas/Mexico border, working as a limo driver in order to support Charles Xavier (Stewart), who now suffers from an unspecified degenerative brain condition that causes him to suffer seizures with terrible effects on those around him. The mutant tracker Caliban (Merchant) acts as Charles’s nurse and struggles to be a conscience to Logan in a world where most mutants have been exterminated. This arrangement is upset when a nurse named Gabriela (Elizabeth Rodriguez) finds Logan and asks him to transport her and a young girl, Laura (Keen) to Dakota.

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Doctor Strange (2016)

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“Open your mind. Change your reality” or “Question reality. Change your destiny” or “The impossibilities are endless.”

Directed by Scott Derrickson
Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Tilda Swinton and Mads Mikkelson

Dr Stephen Strange (Cumberbatch) is a brilliant, but arrogant, neurosurgeon, pioneering new techniques while telling War Machine to take his entirely pedestrian spino-cranial injuries elsewhere. Then he gets into a car crash because he’s using his phone while driving at high speed in the rain – we get it already, he’s reckless – and loses most  of the use of his hands.

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Rebourne – X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)

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“The Future Begins”

Directed by Bryan Singer
Starring Hugh Jackman, Jennifer Lawrence, Jame McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellan, Nicholas Hoult and Peter Dinklage

The Original

Almost a decade before the Marvel Cinematic Universe struck gold, the company’s go-to allegory for prejudice hit the big screen with X-Men (2000). The property had gained considerable traction thanks to an acclaimed 1990s animated series, and in the hands of The Usual Suspects director Bryan Singer, mutants took the world by storm (almost literally, as the release coincided with co-star Halle Berry’s Oscar, resulting in a much larger, if somewhat inconsistent, role in the sequel.) A direct sequel – X2 (2003) – was widely held to be even better, but 2006’s disappointing X-Men: The Last Stand squandered the goodwill – save perhaps for the little bit that was then pissed away by X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) – and threatened to kill the series dead.

The Reboot/Late Sequel

The actual reboot of the series came with 2011’s X-Men: First Class, a 1960s set Cold War adventure, with McAvoy and Fassbender as the younger versions of feuding leaders Charles Xavier and Magneto, previously portrayed in their more patrician years by Stewart and McKellan. First Class did a lot to win back fans with its portrayal of the early years of the X-Men and the break between the two men, and hopefully I’ll get to reviewing that, but then Days of Future Past appeared in 2014 as a late sequel to the original trilogy, as well as a reasonably timed sequel to First Class and so converted the straight reboot into a Star Trek-syle in-universe soft reset of the series as a whole through time travel shenanigans.

Rebourne

Continue reading Rebourne – X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

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Wait; Chadwick Boseman doesn’t get his name above the title? Damnit, Marvel!

“United We Stand. Divided We Fall.”

Directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo
Starring (deep breath) Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johanssen, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Don Cheadle, Jeremy Renner, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Bettany, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Rudd, Emily Van Camp, Tom Holland, Daniel Bruhl and William Hurt

After a brief flashback of the Winter Soldier’s (Stan) cold war career, we see the current Avengers taking down former SHIELD/HYDRA agent Brock ‘Crossbones’ Rumlow, in a fight which ends up devastating a Lagos office block. As a result, the UN ratifies the Sokovia Accords, legislation to regulate the Avengers under the control of a UN panel. Tony Stark (Downey Jr.), wracked with guilt over the Ultron affair, is for it, but Steve Rogers (Evans) is agin it, given his experiences operating under oversight.

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The Wolverine (2013)

Our two stars, Hugh Jackman and his muscles.
Our two stars, Hugh Jackman and his muscles.

“When he’s most vulnerable, he’s most dangerous.”

Directed by James Mangold
Starring Hugh Jackman, Rila Fukushima, Tao Okamoto, Hiroyuki Sanada and Svetlana Khodchenkova

Logan (Jackman) – aka Wolverine – dreams of his past, and an encounter with a Japanese officer and a certain Fat Man at Nagasaki. He wakes in the woods, haunted by nightmares of Jean Grey (Famke Janssen) relating to X-Men: The Last Stand, which is understandable. He is drawn out of his self-imposed retirement to avenge a bear poisoned by stupid hunters, then lured to Japan by Yukio (Fukushima), a retainer to Yashida, the officer Logan saved in Nagasaki.

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Marvel Needs Women

Originally posted at My Life as a Doge. I’ve put it here as well as part of a notion that I might review all of the MCU releases to date now that I’m not restricting myself to unequivocally bad movies.

The MCU's Black Widow is awesome, but she is also one of only two core Phase 1 Avengers not to get her own movie, and has notably different hair in each appearance, where the boys seem fine with a single iconic do*. (Poster for The Avengers, (c) Marvel Studios)
The MCU’s Black Widow is awesome, but she is also one of only two core Phase 1 Avengers not to get her own movie, and has notably different hair in each appearance, where the boys seem fine with a single iconic do*. (Poster for The Avengers, (c) Marvel Studios)

It is not infrequently noted that it is a crying shame that the cinematic juggernaut that is the MCU doesn’t have more female headliners, and just as common for such rejoinders to be offered as: “But it’s got Black Widow,” or “The Captain Marvel movie is in the works,” or “Jane Porter is a strong female character, even if she doesn’t do much fighting,” and all of these are true, but it is still the case that there has yet to be a female headliner. As awesome as many of them are, all of Marvel’s female characters to date are supporting roles. The most common response when the absence of female characters in any given film is mentioned is ‘but this film is about [male character X], and you can’t hold this movie responsible for the general dearth of female leads in Hollywood’. This is, as far as it goes, true, but the thing about the MCU is that it isn’t just one film, it’s twelve films, with another ten already scheduled for Phase 3, and three ongoing TV series with four more in the works (and in fairness, two of those – Agent Carter and Jessica Jones have female leads,) plus one shots, tie-ins and a colossal presence in the cultural zeitgeist.

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Ant-Man (2015)

I love these posters, and am sad as hell that the internet's first response was to photoshop Ant-Man into Black Widow's cleavage.
I love these posters, and am sad as hell that the internet’s first response was to photoshop Ant-Man into Black Widow’s cleavage.

“Heroes don’t come any bigger”

Directed by Peyton Reed
Starring Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly and Michael Douglas

Dr Henry Pym (Douglas), genius and pre-Avengers SHIELD super-soldier, resigns when he discovers the Division is trying to replicate his atomic compression research, but years later learns that his protege Darren Cross (Corey Stoll) – having taken control of his company – is on the verge of releasing the same technology onto the world.

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